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The first known inhabitants of East Hampton and Montauk town were the aboriginal Montaukett — a place name spelled a dozen different ways in early records. It was not a “tribal” name, but a place name which the colonists conferred […]

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Quonettquott, meaning at the long river, is a commonly found name for rivers throughout Long Island and southern New England. Its name can be applied to describe similar rivers and the name had been preserved through early land deeds with various […]

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The territory of this chieftaincy was adjoined by the Matinecocks on the west and extended eastward from the Nissequogue River to Stony Brook and south to the center of the Island. Apparently, there was a disagreement for a time between […]

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In 2003, a group burial was discovering during residential development and a house barn construction, dating back to between 1400 to 1640 AD. Shinnecock tribal members argued against further disruption of the soil, seeing the proposed barn as a cemetery […]

In 2003, a group burial was discovering during residential development and a house barn construction, dating back to between 1400 to 1640 AD. Shinnecock tribal members argued against further disruption of the soil, seeing the proposed barn as a cemetery site.

Despite resistance, the private owners continued development while the remains were reburied in an undisclosed location on Shelter Island.

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Missi Kesukut

Missi Kesukut

At Great Sky

Missi Kesukut is a sacred site that was first preserved in 1991. In 2006, a skull was found in the area, identifying the area as a cemetery and at one time an Indian village. This discovery led to several years of […]

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Noyack

Noyack

A Point, Corner of Land

Noyack was once a village site with evidence of dwellings, burials, cooking hearths, animal remains, and tools. Evidence of both Niantic culture and Sebonic culture are found in the area. Noyack takes its name from the long point or neck of […]

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The Sebonac Creek Site is a Shinnecock settlement occupied from the Late Woodland period until the contact period. A stone pottery fragment resembling a Thunderbird design was found along with evidence of a large wigwam ( 15 by 20 feet ), accompanied […]

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The Duke site, named after Anthony Drexel Duke, is a site that was excavated by the New York State Archaeological Association, L.I. Chapter in 1974.  On this site, a shell midden was found, suggesting the presence of indigenous occupation in […]

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Raconkamuck

Raconkamuck

Boundary Fishing-Place

Ronkonkoma was once a fresh water pond with a prehistoric village settlement. Many nineteenth and twentieth century legends are associated with this site. Today, the water of Lake Ronkonkoma has been deemed too toxic for swimming.

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The Springy Banks site has been described as a favorite summer camping grounds of the Montauk. It receives its name from numerous delicious flowing springs of water that flow from the base of the cliffs here. Many an East Hampton […]

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Pattersquash is an island located in what was originally Unkechaug territory. Pattersquash was first documented in 1670 in a land transaction. Pattersquash is also mentioned in the published Nesaquake Tales, compiled by Rufus B. Langhans. He writes the Indians are […]

Pattersquash is an island located in what was originally Unkechaug territory. Pattersquash was first documented in 1670 in a land transaction. Pattersquash is also mentioned in the published Nesaquake Tales, compiled by Rufus B. Langhans. He writes the Indians are credited with believing that Lake Ronkonkoma was bottomless and connected with the Great South Bay at a place called by them Pattersquash. Pattersquash translated becomes “little round place.”

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Mamanock Neck

Mamanock Neck

Land United To Another

On Mamanock Neck,  a prehistoric Woodland camp and quartz arrowhead workshop site was found. Much of the material culture in this area suggesting human settlement was pottery fragments. The area of Mamanock Neck covers the entirety of the neck of […]

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Unkechaug, a name for the nation of indigenous peoples living in Mastic, New York, translates to “people from beyond the hill.” Today, these hills are part of the Ronkonkoma Moraine, a chain of hills that span the center of Long […]

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Yaphank, a village in Brookhaven town, was originally the name of the creek south of the hamlet. A land deed signed in 1664 by Unkechaug Sachem Tobacus mentions a river called Yamphanke. In the 17th century, the Unkechaug Indians, who […]

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Appaquogue

Appaquogue

A Place Where Flags Grow

Appaquogue is an important site that was once used to harvest cat-tail flag reeds for wigwam creation – thus receiving the name “a place where flags grow.” Today, the pond is known as Lily Pond. On the edge of the water, […]

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Minasseroke (now called Little Neck, or Strongs Neck) is located in Setauket town, between Old-field or Conscience Bay and Setauket Harbor. It is believed to have been the sacred residence of a Setalcott Sachem and his people. Artifacts and funerary […]

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Cataconacke, a name given by the Setauket, is a plot of land now formally known as “Old Field,” attributed by the English. The land was once located north of the original Setauket colonial settlement until 1659. Land Loss In 1659, […]

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At the time of European contact, this area was occupied by a people known as the Agawam or Jabash, possibly a sub-group or village of the large Shinnecock tribe. An Indian trail was located along or near what is now […]

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The Unkechaug Nation maintains a sovereign relationship with the State of New York, other Indian Nations in the United States and Canada and other foreign powers. The Unkechaug Nation is located on the Poospatuck (“where the waters meet”) Reservation in […]

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Messemennuck was once a western territory boundary of the Shinnecock people. Cat-tail ‘flag’ reeds were gathered here to become roofs of wigwams, and the river was bountiful in Alewive fish, whose population has lowered due to their dependency on fresh-water […]

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Indian Fields is a settlement site for the Montaukett Indians with evidence of occupation from the pre-contact Paleo-Indian period until May, 1885. This terrain of 1200 acres of rolling grassland and brush is now a Suffolk County Park.

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Ayeuonganit Wampum Ayimꝏup

Ayeuonganit Wampum Ayimꝏup

In This Place, Wampum Was Made

Ayeuonganit Wampum Ayimꝏup, Here, Wampum Was Made, also known as Parrish Pond, is the site of a former Shinnecock wampum-manufacturing site. In 2000, a protest led by Shinnecock tribal member Rebecca Genia began at Parrish Pond. Despite a peaceful protest, […]

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A small 17th century flaking workshop was found here, north of a large village site. Three thousand stone scrapers were found on the surface, collected since the 1880s.

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Whale’s fin is a sacred site for the Shinnecock, located two and a half miles south west from the current reservation and two miles south east from Canoe Place. Here, the whales were known to beach, potentially as an offering for sustenance […]

Whale’s fin is a sacred site for the Shinnecock, located two and a half miles south west from the current reservation and two miles south east from Canoe Place. Here, the whales were known to beach, potentially as an offering for sustenance to the Shinnecock in the area.

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Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock

Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock

Island Sheltered by Islands, Shelter Island

Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock, the traditional Algonquian name for Shelter Island by the Manhanset group who lived there from pre-historic time until the seventeenth century; is approximately 7907 acres in area. This island is unique for having the largest glacial erratic boulders on Long […]

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Fort Pond in Montauk was once called Konkhunganik by the Montaukett Indians before and during the 1800s at its southern half and Quanuntowunk for its north shore. This site along the south eastern shore was occupied seasonally during the Late […]

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Manitou Hill

Manitou Hill

Hill of the Great Spirit

Manitou Hill is a sacred hill located on what is now known as Manetto Hill in Plainview, New York. An oral story, recorded by historian Gabriel Furman in 1874, describes a legend during a great drought. The Manitou instructs a sachem through a […]

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Weeckatuck

Weeckatuck

The end of the woods

The indigenous peoples who inhabited the general area of Noyack were a small segment of the Shinnecock, known as the Weckatuck (meaning “end of the woods or trees, or end of the cove or creek.” Sometimes spelled Wickatuck, Wecutake, Wecatuck, […]

The indigenous peoples who inhabited the general area of Noyack were a small segment of the Shinnecock, known as the Weckatuck (meaning “end of the woods or trees, or end of the cove or creek.” Sometimes spelled Wickatuck, Wecutake, Wecatuck, Weckatuck, Weeckatuck) . Described by Southampton in a 1964 publication, they were peace loving Indians who settled in isolated groups and lived off shellfish and game. They farmed to a limited degree. Six or eight families lived on one site until the farming land was exhausted, or until collection of refuse became a serious problem. The largest known encampment of Noyack Indians was beside the Mill Pond, now known as the Trout Pond. The last known Weckatucks lived in a wigwam in the back of Mill Pond shortly before the end of the nineteenth century. [1. Southampton, Long Island 325th Anniversary 1640/1965 pp 33]

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Trout Pond from the southern edge

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Patuckquapaug

Patuckquapaug

Round Pond

Patuckquapaug, located on the edge of what is now known as Round Pond in Sag Harbor, was once a village site for what was likely a subgroup of the Shinnecock.

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Kitchaminchok is a sacred place to the Unkechaug people, known for it’s drift whaling. Historically, it is part of a boundary marker mentioned in a 17th century agreement between Sachem Wyandanch and Lion Gardiner that permitted Gardiner to pay five pounds (potentially […]

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Ashawagh

Ashawagh

Land between the streams

Ashawagh is a pre-contact Montaukett settlement on the edge of Copeces, now Hand’s Creek. Shell heaps in the area suggest intense wampum manufacturing. This place was particularly important for hunting, fishing, and camping.

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Listing Results

  • Montaukett

    Montaukett

    Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Quonettquott

    Quonettquott

    Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Nissaquogue

    Nissaquogue

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional)

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  • Horse Barn Burial Site

    Horse Barn Burial Site

    Late Woodland

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  • Missi Kesukut

    Missi Kesukut

    Early Woodland, Late Woodland

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  • Noyack

    Noyack

    Archaic, Late Woodland

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  • Sebonac Creek Settlement

    Sebonac Creek Settlement

    Late Woodland

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  • Duke Site

    Duke Site

    Late Woodland

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  • Raconkamuck

    Raconkamuck

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional), Paleo-Indian, Post-Contact

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  • Springy Banks Pow Wow Grounds

    Springy Banks Pow Wow Grounds

    Contemporary, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Pattersquash Island

    Pattersquash Island

    Contemporary, Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Mamanock Neck

    Mamanock Neck

    Early Woodland, Late Woodland

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  • Ronkonkoma Moraine

    Ronkonkoma Moraine

    Archaic, Contemporary, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional), Paleo-Indian, Post-Contact

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  • Yaphank, Weeks Pond Settlement

    Yaphank, Weeks Pond Settlement

    Early Woodland, Late Woodland

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  • Appaquogue

    Appaquogue

    Late Woodland

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  • Minasseroke

    Minasseroke

    Late Woodland

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  • Cataconacke (Old Field)

    Cataconacke (Old Field)

    Late Woodland

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  • Jabash

    Jabash

    Late Woodland

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  • Unkechaug Indian Reservation

    Unkechaug Indian Reservation

    Archaic, Contemporary, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional), Post-Contact

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  • Messemennuck

    Messemennuck

    Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Indian Fields

    Indian Fields

    Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Ayeuonganit Wampum Ayimꝏup

    Ayeuonganit Wampum Ayimꝏup

    Early Woodland, Late Woodland

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  • Hallock Site

    Hallock Site

    Late Woodland

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  • Whale’s Fin

    Whale’s Fin

    Late Woodland

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  • Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock

    Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional)

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  • Konkhunganik

    Konkhunganik

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Paleo-Indian

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  • Manitou Hill

    Manitou Hill

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Weeckatuck

    Weeckatuck

    Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Patuckquapaug

    Patuckquapaug

    Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Kitchaminchok

    Kitchaminchok

    Late Woodland

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  • Ashawagh

    Ashawagh

    Late Woodland

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